Nature Gazing – Sound Bath

Nature Gazing – Sound Bath

Nature Bathing – Sound Bath

Where there is nature, there is wisdom &  where there are women; There is healing.

Emily Rack – 

For my friend Nella

The day is filled with the buzz and flutter of bees and honeyeaters, water moves over rocks in dribbles and drips, and the chimes of bird chatter fill the tops of trees.

 

Birds create melodies and share conversation in song, frogs whistle, chirp and croak around ponds and dams under the cover of night, and the winds move draping leaves of the eucalypt trees in a soft jostle and hush.

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Nature Gazing

Nature Gazing

Nature Gazing – Part 1

I lay motionless, gazing out the window at the outlines of trees I have known my whole life.

The silhouette of the old shaggy pine tree, a huge weeping giant that shadows the edge of the neighbour’s backyard,  dissolves into black, and night has come.

I can’t believe I am here, is what I think and I roll over in a sort of dream state. I feel totally cocooned in a room that has been mine since the age of 7. It is not the little girls room it once was; exploded with too many hair ribbons and scrunchies. It has been “adulted” by my mother, simplified, and there is nothing pink in sight. But it still is my space, and the huge window that overlooks both ours and the neighbour’s backyards, still frames, almost exactly the same picture for the past 34 years.

Darkness here is a real thing.

Only one streetlight interferes with the otherworldly dimension of stars and planets that are splattered diamond dust in the night sky.

You have a complete view of the milky way on the balcony, and stars beam superbly bright, nothing like the city.

The sound of the night is so pristine that it would be rude to make noise and disturb it with TV and loud conversations, so I sit in my room, with a dull sidelight on next to my bed, and listen.

There is a symphony of insects creating all sorts of rhythms – some hum, others click and strum, while a parade of wildlife starts their show that lasts until the night’s end.

At 1:am a Koala makes an introduction to the valley. Grunting and rumbling its way through the grasses of the paddock outback, it takes residence overnight in mum’s big gum tree.

By the morning, he is gone, and I later find him in another gum tree where his mates are, one leg hung up over a small branch, he looks hot and satisfied.

The next day it would rain – my mother would get sick. I would become her nurse and manage the family of green tree frogs breeding in the swimming pool.

Two weeks alone in my mother’s home and the entire run of the kitchen created an experience never once shared with her or the house. I didn’t get sick with COVID-19, and I wondered if luck, immunity, or my deep focus on nature, my obsessive ‘Nature Gazing’ buffered me?.

There is a lot to be learned on the benefits to our health and mental wellbeing that only nature can provide – and why some of us gravitate to the wild, much more than the average joe.

Disclaimer

None of our content, including information provided by external resources is meant to replace professional medical advice or intervention.

The views and opinions of third party resources included in our posts are not necessarily the views and opinions upheld by Horatio's Jar.

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Making Friends with Trees – Nature Gazing, Part 2

Making Friends with Trees – Nature Gazing, Part 2

Making Friends With Trees

Our brains and bodies talk to trees through energetic and chemical pathways established millions of years ago. Humans came from the forest. We are primates, relatives of great apes, and once upon a time we lived in trees.

When we spend enough time with trees, the ancient connection to them and the earth ignites inside us. Our bodies and brains are receptive to the elemental, chemical and energetic fields circulating throughout the living world. And when we stand with trees and begin to breathe, our body and brain heal themselves.

Nature Bathing

In the process of ‘ nature bathing’, or Shinrin – Yoku, humans can bond to trees when we breathe, and it’s more than the air we share that unites us.

Trees release particular chemical messages into the atmosphere to help them fight diseases. These natural chemical compounds, plant oils and aerosols are also helpful to humans.

 The antiviral and antifungal compounds plants release through their leaves and bark trigger our immune system to create special Killer Cells. KC cells kill viruses and tumours and boost our immunity.

–  Dr Qing Li, ‘Into The Forest’

Resources and Links

Into the Forest 
How Trees Can Help You Find Health and Happiness

(Author: Dr Qing Li, Associate Professor at the Nippon Medical School in Tokyo and President of the Japanese Society of Forest Therapy.)

https://www.penguin.co.uk/articles/2019/may/how-to-improve-your-health-by-forest-bathing-shinrin-yoku.html

 

Tree Huggers Were Onto Something

It is one thing to spend time in nature, and another to make friends with it. Tree huggers have had a bad wrap, but actually, they were and are onto something. I should know. I am one.

Touching the trunk of a tree or even touching something made from wood lowers blood pressure and cortisol levels and balances our hormones. People are calmer, happier and live longer when around trees regularly. Humans that live in houses made from trees and work from desks made of timber a more productive in their work, feel more creative, less distracted and sleep better.

Trees help us to heal, to grieve and to connect to nature, they are the gatekeepers to our elemental world.

Trees are social and emotional beings like we are. They have families, live in communities, communicate via a vast underground communication network, share information and grieve. There is much to be said on our relationship to nature and why we treat it so badly. Everything is perception. How we perceive the world, is how we live in it.

If trees were perceived as friends, family, relatives and mothers we would certainly do much more to hold onto them. I am sure.

I greet the eucalypts along the Yarra as friends. I have a particular bond with some of them that I established through touch, awareness, and presence. Each time I visit them I take the time to share energy by holding gently to their leafy branches and running my hands through theirs. I inhale the perfume and close my eyes. I talk to them like prayer, and I know something is between us, we are friends.

 

Disclaimer

None of our content, including information provided by external resources is meant to replace professional medical advice or intervention.

The views and opinions of third party resources included in our posts are not necessarily the views and opinions upheld by Horatio's Jar.

If you happen across something on our platform that may have been disproven by a reputable resource, please let us know.

Copyright Horatio's Jar, 2022, All Rights Reserved

Shinrin-Yoku, Nature Gazing (Part 2)

Shinrin-Yoku, Nature Gazing (Part 2)

Shinrin-Yoku, Nature Gazing Part 2

My favourite thing in the whole world is staring intensely at living things, foraging for wild edibles, and musing about the magic and history of places out of daily reach.

I am a nature baby – and my top therapeutic activity to restoring tranquillity and calmness to my day is to spend as much time as I can in nature alone.

Feelings of frustration, angst, irritability and brain fog are lifted with enough time surrounded by friendly trees and the sweet sound of birds in the trees.

When I feel off, I know what to do!.
Run, in the direction of the nearest parkland or water source or wilderness and stay there until I feel normal again.
Applying the practices of mindful awareness and patience – and allowing time and intentional focus on the natural and alive – bad moods shift, the mind clears up, and I can return home feeling more connected and less emotional.

Without intending it, my daily practice of Nature Gazing is not too dissimilar from the course of Shinrin-Yoku,(forest bathing) that was established in Japan in the 1990s to help people manage stress and mental illness.

 

Shinrin-Yoku – (Forest Bathing)

→ Find Out More Here 

Thank You

As we journey further into the how and why nature gazing and simple therapeutic practices can work magic on our well-being, I would like to acknowledge the custodians and the traditional landowners of the Kulin Nation and the Worimi peoples whose country keeps me sane.

To Birpai, the country that raised me. Everything I know has come from that place.

Disclaimer

None of our content, including information provided by external resources is meant to replace professional medical advice or intervention.

The views and opinions of third party resources included in our posts are not necessarily the views and opinions upheld by Horatio's Jar.

If you happen across something on our platform that may have been disproven by a reputable resource, please let us know.

Copyright Horatio's Jar, 2022, All Rights Reserved

The Year Earth Changed

The Year Earth Changed

The Year Earth Changed

The worldwide lockdown created a unique space for animals, and nature to rehabilitate, communicate, migrate and breed undisturbed by humans. For the first time in 30 years, the skies over India were clear enough, you could see the Himalayas and in places where tourists swarmed year-round, turtles returned and successfully bred their young.

2020 was a year the whole world would surely not forget anytime soon.

It was a year that marked a change in the way we all lived our lives; it was a year that brought much grief, anxiety and fear. But it also was the first time the world stopped making noise, animals were free to roam the human landscape, and we experienced silence.

Without traffic, street noise, construction or aviation, the world was quiet, and we could finally listen.

Now life is returning to normal – the standard noisy, loud, grinding type; I have noticed a distinct decline in how happy I feel here in Melbourne and how noisy everyone is. This sentiment has continued through my social circle, some finding the traffic so loud they can not sleep.

The return to ‘normal’ in the city is the return of traffic, sirens, parties and lousy neighbours. With our “new normal”, can we find balance in a world so out of sync with the natural way of life?.

This unique documentary, narrated by Sir David Attenborough, catalogues footage captured during the lockdowns of 2020. The footage reveals how wild animals ventured into man-made environments to find food, shelter and build new homes.

The unique experience of a silent world aided the rehabilitation of the living planet and its wonders. 

This article is as a general guide to better health and wellbeing.
It is not intended to replace medical advice. If you are suffering from anxiety, depression or poor health, we strongly advise you to seek medical attention.

We provide resources that are selected on their relevance and believed authenticity. We do not hold responsibility for their accuracy.

We do our best to research all our content to supply truthful and supportive information. We are not responsible for fraudulent or inauthentic claims made by external resources used to create our posts nor do we support the views and opinions of third party sources included in our posts.

Copyright Horatio’s Jar, 2020
All Rights Reserved