The Worlds only Flying Mammals – Bat Facts for Kids

The Worlds only Flying Mammals – Bat Facts for Kids

The Worlds only Flying Mammals – Bat Facts for Kids

Bats live almost everywhere on earth, except the Arctic and Antarctica.

There are 1300 species of bats, and only three of the species are Vampire Bats. So yes, Vampire Bats are real, but they are also tiny and not interested in drinking human blood.

Australians, we have an incredible catalogue of bat species, and many of them adorable and curious to look at. My favourite could be the ‘Eastern Tube-nosed Bat from Queensland. They have gorgeous yellowish specs of colour on their bodies – check out the link to learn more on Australian Bats.

https://australian.museum/learn/animals/bats/eastern-tube-nosed-bat/

 

Bats are significant to the health and balance of all-natural ecosystems. For example, bats are pollinators, and we rely on them for many of the fruits we eat. A single bat can eat up to 3000 small flying insects in an hour. Bats keep our flying insect populations in check; imagine if there were no bats?

Bats do carry diseases, so be very careful not to handle a wild bat without supervision.
Although very rare – bats can give you Rabies, it is important to be careful not to be scratched or bitten by a wild bat.

 

Disclaimer

The views and opinions of third party resources included in our posts are not necessarily the views and opinions held by us.

The information provided is not intended to replace medical advice. Always seek professional medical intervention from a licensed health practitioner, doctor or therapist if you feel unwell.

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If you happen across something on our platform that may have been disproven by a reputable resource, please let us know.

Copyright Horatio's Jar, 2021, All Rights Reserved

Prescription Sound – An Immersive Sound Healing Activity

Prescription Sound – An Immersive Sound Healing Activity

What To Do

Our inaccessibility to nature makes us all really sick, and the less time we spend in the natural world, the worse things are getting for us.

To counter the effects of a world not so well, I  am prescribing you – one dose of natural sound to be taken daily until you have access to your own patch of nature (or you tire of listening to this track and request I make a new one). There are others available on Youtube and Vimeo for free; follow the links.

These sounds and samples are collected from the natural world and transported to you with love.

 

You will need

  • Headphones on both ears.
  • Find somewhere quiet to go while you listen, or lay down before bedtime.
  • Try listening and relaxing to this track for one whole week
  • We will love to hear from you if you notice anything unique happening. 

Prescription Sound – An immersive sound healing activity

Our society has officially become an urban species, and by 2050 it is estimated that 75% of the entire world will live in an urban environment. The implications of life being removed from nature, and the remnants of the real world (the one we are actually from and not the one we are creating), being sectioned off into carefully manicured squares of lawn, smattered here and there amidst the empire of doom we are creating, is to be a harrowing thought.

But it’s the truth, and I am worried. I think of these things as I walk along the sullied banks of the very dirty Yarra River in Melbourne. Almost every day for the last three months, I have walled the overridden path that follows the curve of the Yarra to its bend. This tiny scrap of wilderness that clings to the cliffside that hangs below the road above has become my own little wonderland and a place I have found healing.

 

Hidden Treasures

High enough where people and dogs can not reach are hidden treasures tucked away in long weepy grasses. Spiders with silky doorways spot the cliff sides and hide underneath the exposed roots of old trees. Colourful fungi spring to life in little families hugged closely together after enough rain, and good green moss coats the high side of the hill, and it’s always wet. That’s because there is water coming out of the rock, and I don’t think anyone even notices that there is a natural spring right there?.

On the other side of the river is the backside of the brewery, and tank sized industrial machines rumble all day. The giant world of industry and manufacturing topple the sweet sounds made by tiny animals hiding in this minuscule corridor of green and the thick, sickly smell from the brewery coats the whole forest. Any scintilla of eucalyptus or blossom is stained by industry and filth, and it’s only after deep rain and public holidays that the air gets cleared enough to let the plants and animals breathe.

And yet, amidst the disfunction from one side of the river to the other, harmony can still be met – between two distinctly different worlds. Here on the opposing bank to the doom and gloom of the polluted world, there is life: important tiny life, and if you listen closely and patiently, sounds and songs of native animals and insects emerge. The joy and wonderment this tiny fractured landscape has given me can not be really measured; it’s an experience. And to give you a window in, I collected the sounds that I hear as I walk alone in the forest.

Knowing that the sounds and songs made in nature have the capacity to heal and transform the human mind and body, I hope that spending time listening to these carefully selected sounds will help you to feel a sense of wellbeing and sanctuary-like I do on my walks alone.

Disclaimer

The views and opinions of third party resources included in our posts are not necessarily the views and opinions held by us.

The information provided is not intended to replace medical advice. Always seek professional medical intervention from a licensed health practitioner, doctor or therapist if you feel unwell.

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If you happen across something on our platform that may have been disproven by a reputable resource, please let us know.

Copyright Horatio's Jar, 2021, All Rights Reserved

Hermit Crabs – No More Plastic

Hermit Crabs – No More Plastic

They may look like crabs, but are they?

Hermit crabs are not really like other crabs, sure they look similar, but there are some pretty big differences. Hermit crabs don’t have a hard outer shell covering their whole body. Only the front end has the hard shell of a crustacean, the other half of their body, which is curled inside an acquired home, is soft, squishy and curled to one side.

Hermit Crabs aren’t really hermits at all, and they aren’t exactly crabs either?. Rather than living in solidarity and hiding out in the dark corners of a lonely rock pool, Hermit crabs are incredibly social. They live together in large family groups, swapping shells, sharing tidal pools and fighting over food.

Dressed to Impress

Dressed to impress, hermit crabs share their spacious abode with a garden of friends. Stacked atop their spiralled homes are sea anemones, strange collectables, shells and sometimes human recyclables.

To protect their bodies from the hot sun, hungry birds and octopus, the hermit crab needs to find shelter in the discarded shells of sea snails. Hermit Crabs don’t grow their own shells and need to find new ones as they grow bigger.

If there aren’t enough shells to go around, the hermit crab will find an alternative, and sometimes that could mean recycling human rubbish and popping on a tin can or a plastic cup until a better housing alternative is available.

It may look cute and quirky to see a little crab wearing human garbage, but truthfully the trash we put in the oceans impacts the crabs negatively. Plastics in the sea and everywhere for that matter increase ocean acidification, which means that the ocean becomes toxic, and animals that grow shells like crabs and sea snails, cuttlefish and lobster, won’t be able to anymore and will die.

Hermit crabs choose alternative options with fewer shells available, and this could be anything from a plastic cup to a tin can. Plastic micro-particles in seawater interfere with the hermit’s ability to make decisions when choosing the right sized shell and changes their motor function, meaning they can’t move properly anymore. It’s as if they have a brain injury.

It means they can die from starvation. They can’t move their bodies properly and get eaten by predators because they don’t have the right shell to protect them.

Say ‘no’ to Plastics

Hermit crabs are sensitive social little beings. They live a really long time, as long as 40 years in the wild. There are over 800 species of hermit crab, and they live in coastal areas across the world.
To make sure these cute little guys stick around on our gorgeous planet earth we need to make better choices when it comes to what we buy and how it is packaged.
Plastics are forever, the more we create, the more that ends up in our oceans, our drinking water and our food.
Choose products in the supermarket that have bio-degradable packets, use garbage bags that are compost friendly, and do not buy water in a plastic bottle.
Just a few small changes make a world of good!

Link and Resources

More on Ocean Acidification
https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/acidification.html

What is a Hermit Crab
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/invertebrates/facts/hermit-crabs

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch.
https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/great-pacific-garbage-patch/

Disclaimer

We provide resources selected on their relevance and believed authenticity, but we do not hold responsibility for their accuracy.
We are not responsible for fraudulent or inauthentic claims made by external resources. 

The views and opinions of third party resources included in our posts are not necessarily the views and opinions held by us.

A huge effort goes into creating each article, blog, activity, artwork, and video. The desire is to make sure the information included in our content is useful, meaningful, and honest. If you happen across something on our platform that may have been disproven by a reputable resource, please let us know.

Copyright Horatio’s Jar, 2021, All Rights Reserved

The Nature Of Sound – Guided Meditation

The Nature Of Sound – Guided Meditation

The Nature Of Sound – A Guided Meditation

Duration – 4 min – 10 min

Mother Nature in all her wisdom provides us with everything we need to grow and thrive. The sounds made by the natural world are there to help tune the body to the frequency of the earth, the planets and the stars. A secret symphony that guides our health and wellbeing and leads us to connect with the spirit of who and what we are.

  • Develop your natural ability to self heal by listening mindfully to each and every sound as it is made and then dissipates. Allow your breath to be the invisible tether that keeps you connected to the present moment and to your body.
  • If you get lost come back to the earth where you sit and the beating of your own heart. Follow the songs of the natural world to find a prayer that is unique to you.

Ages 5+

Tips For Your Listening Experience

  • Find a comfortable position where you are not going to be disturbed and play the track from start to finish.
  • Listening with headphones will enhance your experience.

Read More On Natures Wonders Here.

“The relationship medicine men and women have with the natural world has taken millennia to evolve, and it’s a relationship sustained through custom, respect, and balance”… 

We are not responsible for any accident or injury you may incur from practising these activities.
All Rights Reserved, Horatio’s Jar 2019
Copyright Horatio’s Jar

Colour Me A Frog – Wellbeing Activity For Kids and Grownups

Colour Me A Frog – Wellbeing Activity For Kids and Grownups

Colour Me A Frog

Frogs have existed on earth for 250 million years, outliving the dinosaurs and evolving into a myriad of species unique in colour, form and behaviours. Natural habitats rely on amphibians, and without them, the food chain becomes broken, and the habitats die.

More than 4,200 amphibian species are at risk of extinction due to disease, habitat destruction and pollution; that is almost half of all the known species of amphibians on the planet.

Colour Me In

Colour in your own frog and hang it on your wall.
Putting your poster up where people can see will help educate your friends and family about frogs and how important they are to the whole world.

Know Me, Know You – Diaphragmatic Breathing Exercise

Know Me, Know You – Diaphragmatic Breathing Exercise

Know Me, Know You – Diaphragmatic Breathing

Learning to breathe correctly is essential for health and wellbeing and diaphragmatic breathing is an amazing technique in stabilizing and managing emotional disturbances and re-training your nervous system. The ability to connect and grow authentic relationships with our friends and family is essential for your health and wellbeing and learning deep breathing will actually help you develop closely bonded relationships.

 Diaphragmatic breathing activates the Vagus Nerve which is the longest nerve in the body and is connected to your heart, lungs and diaphragm. The Vagus Nerve releases a neurotransmitter called Acetylcholine, which stimulates the growth and repair of nerve cells in your brain, boosts your immunity, reduces inflammation and makes you feel a whole lot calmer, Long, deep and controlled breathing reduces your blood pressure, improves cell function, and reduces the long-term organ damage. Find out more on how you can breathe deeply to live longer here … https://www.horatiosjar.com.au/blog/

This article is used as a general guide to better health and wellbeing.

It is not intended to replace medical advice.

If you are suffering from anxiety, depression or poor health we strongly advise you seek medical attention.

Copyright Horatio’s Jar, 2018

All Rights Reserved