Kids Activity – “What’s Your Mood?”

Kids Activity – “What’s Your Mood?”

Colour your mandala to match your mood.

Colour your Octopus mood mandala to suit your mood. Imagine what it feels like to make each part of your body change colour and pattern to suit your vibes.

 

Kids Activity – What’s Your Mood?

Imagine if you could change the colour of your skin to match your mood, communicate in a language of light, and camouflage yourself into the chair you are sitting in when you want to become totally invisible?

Well, that exactly what an Octopus can do!.

From invisibility cloaks to complex problem-solving abilities, glowing colour-changing skin, shape-shifting bodies and smoky doppelgängers; the octopus, with their agile intelligence, alien bodies, and visual communication systems are spectacularly peculiar and brilliantly adapted to their liquid world.

Octopuses have feelings

From invisibility cloaks to complex problem-solving abilities, glowing colour-changing skin, shape-shifting bodies and smoky doppelgängers; the octopus, with their agile intelligence, alien bodies, and visual communication systems are spectacularly peculiar and brilliantly adapted to their liquid world.

Boneless, multi-talented, hypersensitive and smarter than a domesticated dog, the octopus is the closest we have come to alien intelligence. Octopuses can feel and think through their whole body, they have complex neurological systems, nine brains and the ability to edit their genetics.

Sensitive, inquisitive, shy and playful the Octopus-like it’s cephalopod relatives can change the colour, texture and pattern of its skin to camouflage and to express feelings. When an Octopus is white it is relaxed, red means stressed and blue and other marine colours are in play with their environment.

What colour are you?

This article is as a general guide to better health and wellbeing.
It is not intended to replace medical advice. If you are suffering from anxiety, depression or poor health, we strongly advise you to seek medical attention.

We provide resources that are selected on their relevance and believed authenticity. We do not hold responsibility for their accuracy.

We do our best to research all our content to supply truthful and supportive information. We are not responsible for fraudulent or inauthentic claims made by external resources used to create our posts nor do we support the views and opinions of third party sources included in our posts.

Copyright Horatio’s Jar, 2020
All Rights Reserved

The End of Emotions

The End of Emotions

The End of Emotions

Have you ever wondered what emotions are and where they actually come from? I have. In fact, the very reason I researched this article was because I wasn’t sure myself of how I feel, what I feel and how I am supposed to define my changing states.

 It was a week or so ago where I sat on my couch baffled at my state of nonchalance. I was unbothered – not flat, just present, still and curious. What do I feel? What should I feel? , and where to find the answers?.

Where are my emotions I wondered?. What are emotions and how do we know which ones to pay attention to?
I searched high and low for concrete answers to my plaguing questions, and still, it seems a little unclear as to what goes where.

Theory of Emotions

Theorists suggest that emotions – the ones that are said to be universal are a part of the survival package we get handed from birth. Experts say we have five to seven universal emotions, shared by man, woman, child and beast and that everyone understands these to be the same.

These fundamental emotions according to Dr Paul Ekman are; Happiness, Sadness, Fear, Disgust, Anger, Contempt and Surprise. Dr Paul Ekman pioneered the field of micro- expressions and mapped the 43 facial muscles used in emotional expression. Dr Ekman has influenced politics, governments and  popular culture through his research. 

Confident in his work the Dalai Lama commissioned Dr Paul Ekman and his daughter Dr Eve Ekman in a brand new interactive virtual platform called ‘The Atlas of Emotions’, where you can explore the complex dimension of feelings and their intensity.

http://atlasofemotions.org

Paul Ekman is a well-known psychologist and co-discoverer of micro expressions. He was named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by TIME magazine in 2009. He has worked with many government agencies, domestic and abroad. Dr. Ekman has compiled over 50 years of his research to create comprehensive training tools to read the hidden emotions of those around you.. (https://www.paulekman.com/blog/atlas-of-emotions/)

And Then, There Was Lisa

Experts say emotions are energy in motion – that emotions cause us to  make actions and that each emotion has its unique physiological thumbprint. Research says that there are 35,000 different emotions and each is unique. If we embody emotions and there are so so many, how would we cope with so many physiological changes?. This bothered me – imagine if there are 35,000 different available emotions, how many variable chemical cocktails, muscle movements and behaviours would we make all day?.

It also bothered me, that I could not find a reliable source to where all these emotions arise from, how we make them or even make sense of them. The information I had so far accessed seemed to be very wishy-washy, and hard to make sense with. Still, the answer remained, what is an emotion? where do they come from?, and are the ones I have real or just made up?. 

And then I came across Dr Lisa Feldman Barrett and bit by bit the elusive construct of metaphor and allegory started to make sense. Dr Barrett in her research literally annihilates claims made by contemporaries in the field of emotional sciences and psychology, by stating that most of the published works rely on unsubstantiated evidence and bogus claims. 

Lisa Feldman Barrett is a university distinguished professor of psychology at Northeastern University, where she focuses on affective science. She is a director of the Interdisciplinary Affective Science Laboratory. Along with James Russell, she is the founding editor-in-chief of the journal Emotion Review. Wikipedia

She has written a book called –  How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of The Brain.

In The End

In my quest to uncover the reality of emotions I discovered a lot of different theories, emotional charts and diagrams, character stereotypes and contradictions.

In the end, understanding your emotions is a skill, emotions are difficult to define, how we feel is unique to us and sharing emotions at the right time, is magic.

This article is as a general guide to better health and wellbeing.
It is not intended to replace medical advice. If you are suffering from anxiety, depression or poor health, we strongly advise you to seek medical attention.

We provide resources that are selected on their relevance and believed authenticity. We do not hold responsibility for their accuracy.

We do our best to research all our content to supply truthful and supportive information. We are not responsible for fraudulent or inauthentic claims made by external resources used to create our posts nor do we support the views and opinions of third party sources included in our posts.

Copyright Horatio’s Jar, 2020
All Rights Reserved

ADHD on The Brain & What Mindfulness Can Do To Change It

ADHD on The Brain & What Mindfulness Can Do To Change It

ADHD on The Brain & What Mindfulness Can Do About It.

ADHD as described by world authority Dr Russell Barkley – a clinical psychologist and clinical professor of psychiatry at the VCU Commonwealth University – is not a disorder of inattention – but an inability to self -regulate and an executive function disorder. The brain regions designed for higher cognitive function are faulty and underdeveloped.

Written By – Emily Rack

 

ADD OR ADHD?.

 The definition of ADHD – Attention Deficit Hyper-Activity Disorder and ADD – Attention Deficit Disorder are not distinguishable from one another. ADD is no longer used as a label for the disorder; there is only ADHD. The diagnostic name ADHD is under scrutiny from Clinicians and experts because it limits the perception of the disorder, which is much more than a deficit in attention.

ADHD is often mistakenly believed to be a behavioural problem in children that is characterised by an inability to concentrate, disruptive behaviour, aggression, inattentiveness, and emotional instability, as well as difficulties socialising and maintaining relationships.

People with ADHD are labelled lazy, careless and unreliable, and the added stigma that ADHD is a bad thing to have increases the anxiety and shame that sufferers feel.

Kids with the disorder often have trouble keeping up with classmates and are prone to emotional meltdowns which often isolate them socially. Parents often feel judged and insecure about their parenting, blaming themselves or being blamed for their child’s uncontrollable behaviours.

ADHD is a very distressing condition to have whether you are a child or an adult. Rarely understood and regarded as a trivial mental ailment, the disorder needs to be recognised as a severe impairment and treated with the respect other major psychiatric disorders are.

Widely Misunderstood

ADHD is one of the most misunderstood neurological disorders, says Dr Russell Barkley the world authority on the developmental disorder. He says that ADHD is a severe neurological condition that has enormous impactions on the lives of people who have it.

ADHD impairs the self – regulatory systems in the brain, so someone that has it finds typical day to day tasks difficult to achieve and more complex planning near impossible. The goals and aspirations of someone with ADHD are often inaccessible to them – not because they aren’t intelligent enough, but because they can not activate their acquired skills.

With an ADHD brain, there is a gulf between one hemisphere to another. Somehow the information from the back of the mind needs to leap into the front. Goodluck. That is why people with ADHD take stimulant medications. The medication boosts the neurotransmitters – dopamine and norepinephrine so the brain regions that struggle to adhere to each other – communicate.

 

The Emotional Roller – Coaster

One of the hallmarks of ADHD is that of emotional dysregulation – the inability to control one’s emotions or respond to situations appropriately. Most of us can self- regulate from the inside out, but someone with ADHD can become dysregulated by external factors, meaning their mood and behaviour is subject to the outside world.

Anger, aggression and destructive behaviour are often a result of intense emotional fluctuations and overload – and without the hardware inside their head to maintain equilibrium someone with ADHD can turn feral and lose their temper very quickly. These impulsive out-of-control bursts of fury, rage and tears are what defines the disease in the eyes of society.  

People with ADHD can not self soothe, and just like a newborn baby, require the nervous system of another human being to help regulate their own. The anger we see is coming from pain and fear triggered by an overactive fight and flight reflex. They are prisoners to their primitive mind, and losing control comes with embarrassment and shame – followed by guilt and resentment.

That is why someone with ADHD should be given adequate support from teachers, friends, colleagues and family to learn how to manage emotions and self – regulate behaviour. Helping someone with ADHD manage their time and priorities, identity goals and make plans to achieve them significantly reduce the sensations of anguish and frustration they feel.

There is No Cure

There is no cure for ADHD, and it doesn’t disappear as you get older – you might be less hyperactive, but the restlessness becomes internalised, and it creates anxiety.
Having the right support from doctors, clinicians and the community as well as learning how to self manage the condition makes a difference.

If ADHD was understood in more detail and respected as an acute developmental disorder, more interventions at an early age could be in place offering the sufferer and families are more significant opportunity to thrive in school, relationships, working life and the community. Cognitive and behavioural disorders are socially and emotionally isolating, so it’s important to share the facts, change our perceptions and create the right kinds of environments for everyone to thrive.

Mindfulness Practices Are Awesome for People With ADHD

Mindfulness is a blanket term for different brain training activities like meditation, mindfulness breathing, and yoga. The skills taught in mindfulness are designed to enhance one’s ability to stay focused and aware of the present moment. The strengthening of concentration and attention through mindfulness is fantastic for people with ADHD, and it helps when it comes to making the right decisions and planning for the future.

Mindfulness helps with mind wandering and unwanted thoughts, which free our mental space for more creative pursuits. Practising mindfulness improves our overall wellbeing. It encourages compassion, kindness, and self -care and with that a gentler approach to life. Understanding is the key to living a healthy and happy life.

We are all set with strengths and limitations, and it is through our experience and understanding of them that we learn compassion and acceptance of ourselves and everyone else.

Resources and References

(FYI how someone with ADHD experiences time is different from ordinary people and regular planners and diaries will not work in organising their life)

Check out Ryder Carrols Method in personal planning designed for people with ADHD. 

https://bulletjournal.com/pages/about

Bullet Journal® (or BuJo® for short) was created by Ryder Carroll, a digital product designer and author living in Brooklyn, NY. Diagnosed with learning disabilities early in life, he was forced to figure out alternate ways to be focused and productive. Through years of trial and error, he developed a methodology that went far beyond the simple organisation. Now he focuses on helping others learn what the Bullet Journal method is truly about: the art of intentional living.

 

http://www.russellbarkley.org/about.html
Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D., is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center (VCUMC), Richmond, VA.

Dr. Barkley is a Diplomate (board certified) in three specialties, Clinical Psychology (ABPP), Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, and Clinical Neuropsychology (ABCN, ABPP). He is also a Fellow in the American Psychological Association. A clinical scientist, educator, and practitioner, he has published 25 books, rating scales, and clinical manuals now numbering 43 separate editions. He has also published more than 300 scientific articles and book chapters on ADHD and related disorders. He founded The ADHD Report (Guilford), a clinical newsletter in its 28th year and on which he serves as Editor. He has created seven award winning professional videos on ADHD and defiant children. – 
https://youtu.be/sPFmKu2S5XY

 

 

This article is as a general guide to better health and wellbeing.
It is not intended to replace medical advice. If you are suffering from anxiety, depression or poor health, we strongly advise you to seek medical attention.

We provide resources that are selected on their relevance and believed authenticity. We do not hold responsibility for their accuracy.

We do our best to research all our content to supply truthful and supportive information. We are not responsible for fraudulent or inauthentic claims made by external resources used to create our posts nor do we support the views and opinions of third party sources included in our posts.

Copyright Horatio’s Jar, 2020
All Rights Reserved

Buddha’s Wisdom – Timeless Insights Into Personal Success

Buddha’s Wisdom – Timeless Insights Into Personal Success

Buddha – Wisdom is Timeless

Considering the timeless wisdom of Buddha, it would seem as though the success of your reality and the happiness of your existence has more to do with imagination and visualisation than action.

What will you think of next? Perhaps you could rewrite your destiny by spending a few moments visualising the life you want and how you want to live it. 

Peace Giants – Lao Tzu

Peace Giants – Lao Tzu

Lao Tzu 

The Tao 8 – The Supreme Good Is Like Water.

The supreme good is like water,
which nourishes all things without trying to.
It is content with the low places that people disdain.
Thus it is like the Tao.

In dwelling, live close to the ground.
In thinking, keep to the simple.
In conflict, be fair and generous.
In governing, don’t try to control.
In work, do what you enjoy.
In family life, be completely present.

When you are content to be simply yourself
and don’t compare or compete,
everybody will respect you.

Lao Tzu » 4th Century BC

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laozi

PEACE GIANTS – Thich Nhat Hanh

PEACE GIANTS – Thich Nhat Hanh

“You Must Love In Such A Way That The Person You Love Feels Free.”

– Thich Nhat Hanh-

A global Peace Giant, Thich Nhat Hanh has revolutionised our way of seeing the world through his prayers, philosophy, activism and teachings.

Thich Nhat Hanh has published over 100 books, including classics like The Miracle of Mindfulness and Peace is Every Step.
– Plum Village

Thich Nhat Hanh

Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh, renowned for bridging Eastern and Western spirituality, is the 2015 Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award recipient.

Thich Nhat Hanh Receives the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award